Tag Archives: Affordable Care

2013 HSA Contribution Limits

2013 HSA Contribution Limits

The IRS has recently announced the new contribution limits for HSA’s (Health Savings Accounts).

HSA contribution limits: 

  • Individuals (self-only coverage) – $3,250 (up $150 from 2012)
  • Family coverage – $6,450 (up $200 from 2012)

HDHP minimum required deductibles:

  • $1,250 for self-only coverage
  • $2,500 for family coverage

Out-of-pocket maximum:

(Out-of-pocket expenses include deductibles, co-payments, and other amounts, but not premiums)

  • $6,250 for self-only coverage
  • $12,500 for family coverage

Under guidelines implemented in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, over-the-counter drugs may only be reimbursed if they have a prescription. If a policyholder uses an HSA to pay for items or services that aren’t qualified medical expenses, the tax penalty is 20 percent of the HSA distribution.

How Healthcare Reform Will Affect Medicare

How Healthcare Reform Will Affect Medicare

On March 23, 2010 the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, better known as healthcare reform, was signed into law. Medicare beneficiaries have had many questions about how their benefits will be affected by the new legislation. For most people on Medicare, the changes will be transparent, and their benefits will continue to be delivered as they always have. The cost of the improvements in healthcare will be largely covered by reductions in fraud and waste in the system and by the elimination of the Medicare Advantage subsidies that have been in place up to this point. Below are some specific changes that Medicare beneficiaries can expect to see with the new law.

Medicare Part D

Currently, Medicare prescription drug plans have a coverage limit of $2,850. When drug costs reach that limit, consumers enter the "donut hole" and are obligated to pay 100% of the cost of their prescription medications. Customers stay in the donut hole until they have paid $3,610 in out-of-pocket costs, at which point they qualify for catastrophic coverage. Under the new law, the donut hole will gradually be eliminated between now and 2020. Starting in 2010, anyone entering the donut hole will receive a $250 rebate. In 2011, there will be a 50% discount on name-brand drugs while in the donut hole and a 7% discount on generics. The discounts will increase annually until the donut hole is gone.

Medicare Part B

Under Medicare right now, seniors pay a $155 annual deductible for Medicare Part B, which is the medical insurance part of Medicare. Beneficiaries also pay 20% of the cost for preventive care, including any tests or screenings, and annual physical exams not covered. In 2011, the 20% co-pay for preventative screenings for things such as cancer and diabetes will be eliminated. Also starting in 2011, an annual physical will be covered at no cost to the patient.

Medicare Advantage

Medicare Advantage plans were put into place in an attempt to privatize Medicare and have Medicare benefits provided by private insurers rather than the government. Medicare has been paying insurers a 10% subsidy which will be eliminated in 2012. Since this will result in greater costs for the insurance companies, it is likely that some plans will disappear, some will have higher premiums and others will have reduced benefits. Plans that are determined to be high quality by Medicare will receive bonus payments, however, that will offset the loss of the subsidy.

There are other changes to Medicare resulting from the new healthcare legislation, but these are the ones that seniors are most likely to be affected by. It is important for anyone aging into Medicare to read up on the benefits they are entitled to and to know what to expect. Detailed information on all aspects of Medicare can be found online at Medicare.gov.